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Trawler runs aground on Rum - February 2011

21-08-2010

Stornoway Coastguard search and rescue helicopter air-lifted 14 French fishermen to safety after their vessel ran aground last night – only hours after Maritime and Coastguard Chief Executive Sir Alan Massey had visited the island station to discuss possible MCA closures. FV Jack Abry II had been at sea for just under 10 hours before it struck rocks at low tide on the north west coast of the Isle of Rum yesterday (Monday, January 31). Listing heavily in the moderate swell with a west/south westerly wind force seven to eight, the crew of the stricken trawler prepared themselves in survival suits as a Mayday call was sent out, received by Stornoway coastguard station at 11.23pm.

Mallaig RNLI lifeboat launched to the aid of the Jack Abry II at 11.46pm and the Stornoway MCA search and rescue helicopter airlifted off at 12.26am, arriving on the scene at 1am. Within 20 minutes of arrival, the chopper crew had airlifted all 14 fishermen to safety, and returned them to Stornoway airport, where they were met by the Fishermens Mission's Port Missioner Finlay Macleod. Although suffering from mild exposure, the fishing crew were uninjured and have been provided emergency accommodation in the Caladh Inn, Stornoway. Speaking of the incident, Jack Abry II skipper Xavier Leaute said: "The men are okay and that is principle for me. "We want to thank you to all the crew of the coastguard and the lifeboat as it was a very big wind to winch up in. It was very difficult for the helicopter. We say very much thank you." FV Jack Abry II had been at sea for just under 10 hours before it struck rocks at low tide on the north west coast of the Isle of Rum yesterday (Monday, January 31). Listing heavily in the moderate swell with a west/south westerly wind force seven to eight, the crew of the stricken trawler prepared themselves in survival suits as a Mayday call was sent out, received by Stornoway coastguard station at 11.23pm. Mallaig RNLI lifeboat launched to the aid of the Jack Abry II at 11.46pm and the Stornoway MCA search and rescue helicopter airlifted off at 12.26am, arriving on the scene at 1am. Within 20 minutes of arrival, the chopper crew had airlifted all 14 fishermen to safety, and returned them to Stornoway airport, where they were met by the Fishermens Mission's Port Missioner Finlay Macleod.

Although suffering from mild exposure, the fishing crew were uninjured and have been provided emergency accommodation in the Caladh Inn, Stornoway. Speaking of the incident, Jack Abry II skipper Xavier Leaute said: "The men are okay and that is principle for me. "We want to thank you to all the crew of the coastguard and the lifeboat as it was a very big wind to winch up in. It was very difficult for the helicopter. We say very much thank you."

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'Trawler Grounded because skipper fell asleep' - August 2011Location of Jack Abry II © Maritime and Coastguard Agency / maville.com

FishUpdate.com - 17/08/2011

An official investigation has found that a  big French stern trawler  grounded off the West of Scotland  after her skipper fell asleep.The Marine Accident Investigation Branch (MAIB) summary  of the incident said that  at about 2316 on January  31  this year, the stern trawler Jack Abry II grounded on the Isle of Rum in heavy weather, while on passage from Lochinver to her intended fishing grounds. Mallaig’s all-weather lifeboat (ALB) and Stornoway coastguard helicopter were called out and the 14-strong crew were airlifted off the vessel. Some oil pollution resulted and the vessel was subsequently declared a constructive total loss. There were no injuries.

The MAIB investigation established that the skipper, who had been alone on watch in the wheelhouse, fell asleep and failed to make a course alteration. He had joined the vessel in Lochinver on the day of the accident after travelling from his home in France. “ It is likely,” the report goes on, “ that the  skipper became fatigued through a combination of personal stress, a prolonged period without sleep and poor quality rest before leaving his home. The wheelhouse watch alarm was not used, nor was best use made of the available navigational aids and crew. “

The report adds that a recommendation has been made to the owners of Jack Abry II designed to “enhance the safety management of its fleet” by the provision of operational instructions and guidance, to its crews. The rescue was co-ordinated  by Stornoway Coastguard .

 
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